Disc Reviews: The African Blues Project + Putumayo’s Afro-Caribbean Party

By Ernest Barteldes

The West African Blues Project (Arc Music) came into my mailbox in a package from Europe that included several other CDs, and it kind of got lost in the shuffle as I sorted out all the music I’d received while Renata and I were in Brazil – two weeks don’t seem to be a lot, but when you get advance music to review like I do, it does get problematic.

The album brings together guitarist Ramon Goose and multi-instrumentalist Moudou Touré, and they do an intriguing blend of American blues and West African folk music. It’s not quite a blues record per se but a collection of tunes that show how two distinct genres come together seamlessly. For instance, “Lolambe” is a fast-paced shuffle dominated by guitar and drums and frantic vocals at an incredible pace. “The Lighthouse Keeper” is the closest to a twelve-bar blues that you can get here, with heartfelt vocals, a cleverly played acoustic guitar and a nice bass & drums backbeat. Also notable are “Casamance River Blues, a pleading slow-tempo tune and also “Kayre,” a reggae-tinged mostly acoustic number.

Putumayo’s Afro Caribbean Party follows in the tradition of its previous releases – a small sample of various artists from different areas of the Caribbean that looks outside the usual box of Puerto Rico, Jamaica and Cuba – the disc opens with Martinique’s Kali, who sings “La Grev Bare Mwen,” an up-tempo zouk played mostly with acoustic instruments, and follows with Jamaica-born Clinton Fearon (and current Seattle resident)’s “Come By Yah,” an cheerful tune about enjoying the beauties of life.

Cuba is represented by Asere, a sextet that does a mix of traditional and modern music – they have the traditional elements of the music – congas, acoustic guitar and horns – but their approach is attuned to the sensibilities of modern pop music, as evidenced by “A Favor del Viento.”   Also worth checking out is “Mango LaFrance” from Jan Sebon & Kazak International, a Haitian ensemble that plays West African-inspired music.

Both albums are highly enjoyable, and are immensely cool when heard side by side – you really notice where some of the sounds came from, and how they evolved in different directions while retaining the same basic essence.

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