Concert Review: Trio da Paz Featuring Joyce Moreno and Dori Caymmi at Birdland

 

triodapaz

By Ernest Barteldes

Trio da Paz

Featuring Joyce Moreno and Dory Caymmi

Birdland

February 25, 2016

New York, NY

 

 

Trio da Paz – the legendary Brazilian jazz trio formed by Duduka Da Fonseca, Nilson Matta and Romero Lubambo – celebrated the release of their 30th Anniversary CD with a residence at New York’s Birdland Jazz Club with special guests Joyce Moreno and Dory Caymmi – the first time all five artists collaborated on a live setting.

The trio started out with “Saudade da Bahia,” a tune by the late Dorival Caymmi with an arrangement built around Lubambo’s lead guitar and improvisations. It was a clear demonstration of their great chemistry, as they responded to the guitarist’s accents with barely a look at each other.  Moreno joined them and paid homage to what she called “their predecessors” with a very personal rendition of “Chega de Saudade”, beginning accompanied by her own guitar and joined by the band after a few measures. She included a few snippets of “Aquarela do Brasil” to the tune as Lubambo riffed around the melody.  She followed by her own “Essa Mulher,” a tune Lubambo mentioned he’d personally selected for the set, including an accomplished bass solo by Matta.   Dori Caymmi joined the group and sang his “Joazinho Boa Pinta” a humorous tune about a good-looking rascal of sorts. The trio left the stage as Caymmi and Moreno played a beautiful duet on Jobim’s “Dindi” with Caymmi on guitar. They followed that with Caetano Veloso’s “Sampa,” a song written as a tribute of Brazil’s largest city.

I like to say that Trio da Paz are “the Rolling Stones” of Brazilian jazz because they have great individual moments as bandleaders in their own right, but there is clearly some magic when they perform and record together.  This perception is renewed every time I hear them live – in spite of all these years, they are symbiotic and work together in a manner  rarely seen with ensembles where the focus is on individuality. This was clear at Birdland, when they took on originals tunes and classics like “Voce Foe a Bahia,” a playful melody on the uniqueness of Caymmi’s native state.

It was a great experience to hear Trio da Paz with their guests – I just wish the set I heard had included Da Fonseca’s “Flying Over Rio” – but I am sure there will be other chances for that soon enough.

 

 

 

Concert Review: Brasil Guitar Duo at Americas Society

 

 

 

guitarduo

By Ernest Barteldes

 

Brasil Guitar Duo

Americas  Society

February 19, 2016

New York, NY

 

 

Playing before a filed room in New York’s  Americas Society, The Brasil Guitar Duo formed by João Luiz and Douglas Lora kicked off their CD release event with Astor Piazzola’s “Zita,” a complex tango that the duo arranged for two guitars and set the tone for the rest of the evening. The duo played with zero amplification (there were two overhead microphones, but I believe those were for recording the set), but the acoustics of the room made it possible for them to be heard no matter where you were seated. They continued with Jean-Phillipe Rameau’s “Les Cyclops,” a tune that showcased their soloing and chord techniques.

They followed with Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco’s “Prelude and The Fugue no. 7,” a very interesting Bach-inspired composition filled with 1/16 notes and changing tempos. They followed that with a selection of tunes by Brazilian composer Egberto Gismonti, beginning with “A Fala da Paixão,” a mellow ballad in which Luiz played solos filled with octaves, and followed with “Sete Anéis,” a tune with a strong rural Brazilian feel and a quirky middle section with harmonics and extraneous sounds.

After a brief intermission, they played Leo Brouwer’s “Sonata de Los Viajeros,” a track from their CD dedicated to the works of the Cuban composer, which was released that evening. The composition is divided into four distinctive movements, beginning with “Primer Viaje a Tierras Heladas,” which started with a tranquil mood and then became agitated, as to represent the travelers’ journey from the Caribbean Sea to the North Atlantic. “La Venus de Praxiteles” had more of a contemplative feel, while “Visita a Bach en Leipzig” had more of a classical feel. The piece ended with “Por El Mar de Las Antillas,” which had a traditional Cuban feel.

The concert ended with Marco Pereira’s “Bate-Coxa,” an up-tempo “Coco,” a popular northeastern Brazilian beat. It was a nice closing to the concert, since it got out of the seriousness of Brouwer’s composition, taking the music to a more playful feel.

The concert was hosted by WQXR’s Terrance McKnight, who talked with the musicians between songs, tracing their musical influences and their beginnings and also their working relationship and their musical choices. They also talked about their beginnings in Brazil and the guitar teacher who first had them play together when they were younger.

 

Live Review: Leslie DiNicola, Lee DeWyze & Wakey Wakey at The Cutting Room

By Ernest Barteldes

 

Leslie DiNicola, Lee DeWyze & Wakey Wakey

Cutting Room

February 12, 2016

New York, NY

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On the CD release event for folk/rock singer Lee Dewyze at the Midtown Manhattan music venue, Leslie DiNicola opened the evening accompanied by guitarist Greg Neal, playing a short set comprised mostly of original tunes. I had never heard of her music before, but I was impressed by her strong voice and honest delivery – on the sole cover (a song by Demi Lovato), she made it sound her own, departing from the original version and giving it her distinctive feel.

Next up was Wakey! Wakey! (the stage name of singer-songwriter and actor Michael Grubbs), who accompanied himself on the electric piano, playing songs from his upcoming album “Overreactivist” (Family) and other tunes from his catalogue. It was a lively set in which he cracked jokes about his being a longtime fan of Harry Connick Jr.  and other personal stories. Among the highlights was a tune about New York in which he was critical of religious piety and small town life versus the way he was brought up. He also played “Heartbroke,” a tune he performed on the TV show “One Tree Hill,” where he got one of his big breaks.

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Wakey Wakey

Wakey! Wakey! is clearly inspired by jazz and musical theatre – his vocal chops and delivery seem fit for musicals, and his piano skills have strains of jazz without being exactly improvisational. The set was highly entertaining and the music was quite interesting to hear.

After a short break Lee Dewyze came on, backed by his own acoustic guitar and an electronic bass drum pedal, which he used to mark some parts of the tunes. He mostly showcased music from “Oil and Water,” (Shanachie) but also included a handful of older songs, including a very personal cover of Sam Smith’s “Stay with Me” that focused mostly on his guttural vocals and accomplished guitar strumming.

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He had the stage set up with book-like lights around him, and there were also several books scattered around him – there was no explanation what it was about, and concentrated instead on speaking about his music and approach to songwriting.

Dewyze used several guitar tunings, including open and drop D (a technique famously used by Brian May on Queen’s “Fat Bottomed Girls”). He made little reference to his time on American Idol (he was the winner of season 9), stating once between songs that he’d prefer to be remembered for his own songwriting than his time on the TV contest.

I was impressed by how much control he has of his voice – he goes from singing in an almost whispered tone to a stronger, throaty voice – this was mostly evident on “Stay with Me” and the music on the new album.

It was a memorable evening of musical discovery – I don’t often get to hear independent pop artists, but I definitely would like to hear more from these three performers in the near future.

Album Review: Hiromi/Spark

By Ernest Barteldes

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I have been following Hiromi’s career for quite a while – I have always been in awe not only of her unique approach to jazz piano but also her fiery performances  either as a bandleader or a side player with Stanley Clarke, which I was fortunate enough to hear not once but twice – at the Blue Note (with Lenny White on drums) and later that year at Central Park Summerstage.

When playing live, she becomes almost one with the music, using her entire body to deliver the music. She has incredible speed and her tunes mix more traditional contemporary jazz with electronic elements.  When performing with her band, the sound is incredibly tight, and their chemistry is palpable.

On Spark (Telarc/Concord), Hiromi reunites with the trio project from 2010’s “Move” (Telarc/Concord), which is rounded out by Anthony Jackson (electric bass) and Simon Phillips (drums).  The disc opens with the title track, a nine-minute tour-de-force that begins with a mellow, classically inflected piano solo that evolves into a progressive piece in which the bandleader exercises her creativity with a solid backbeat from the rhythm section.

“In a Trance” is a fast-paced in which Phillips doubles the entire piano’s notes with the drums – everything is played with incredible speed that it takes a few hearings to fully grasp everything, but just as you adjust the song changes pace into a Brazilian-like, laid-back feel before it goes back to the original melody.  Things don’t quite slow down until “Wake Up and Dream,” a mellifluous solo piano ballad reminiscent of 2009’s “Place to Be,” her only solo piano album to date. “Spark” closes with “All’s Well,” a straight-ahead, bluesy tune that allows the band to stretch and showcase a more playful side.

With “Spark,” Hiromi has not veered from her path of musical exploration, and the tunes have welcome twists that surprise even fans familiar with her previous works.

Hiromi

Spark

Telarc/Concord

2016