Jon Batiste & Stay Human at Celebrate Brooklyn

Article and photos by Ernest Barteldes

 

Jon Batiste & Stay Human

Celebrate Brooklyn

Prospect Park Bandshell

Friday, July 22nd 2016

 

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Jon Baptiste

After two opening acts that included a brilliant saxophone trio formed by three very young musicians aged from 12 to 16 years of age, bandleader and evening curator Jon Batiste took to the stage on the melodica backed by an 8-piece band of multi-instrumentalists, kicking off the show with a marching band-style take on  the Christmas standard “My Favorite Things”  that was blended with  “Papa Was a Rolling Stone.” He then went to the piano for an instrumental version of blues standard “St. James’ Infirmary” where he showcased his dexterity on the piano.

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Jon Baptiste

Stay Human have great chemistry together, responding to the bandleader’s grooves with expertise, even when he went off with some improvised moment – I guess that tightness comes from performing on a nightly basis on the Late Show with Stephen Colbert on CBS (I compare with the last time I saw the band at The Charlie Parker Jazz Festival two or three years ago).

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Young Sax Trio

Batiste is open to many genres – at one moment, he is playing a boogie take on the “Star Spangled Banner” and the next going into a full rock mode and then drifting into a personal take on “Pour Elise,” which featured a bass solo. The set included covers of The Jackson Five’s “I Want You Back” with the bassline played on the tuba, which preceded included a tuba battle and a full French Quarter-style marching band tune in which the ensemble walked into the audience.

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Stay Human

It was a great opportunity to see Batiste outside of the constraints of a TV studio setting, where he stretched the music and improvised freely – I heard some folks in the audience hoping Colbert would make an appearance (considering his recent vocal performances) but that did not happen – instead, the audience was taken to an amazing musical journey under the direction of an amazingly talented bandleader who we all hope to hear again – on stage – soon.

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Krar Collective + Hakim at Celebrate Brooklyn

 

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Krar Collective

Article and photos by Ernest Barteldes

 

Krar Collective + Hakim

Celebrate Brooklyn

Prospect Park Bandshell

Brooklyn, NY

July 15, 2016

On what turned out to be a very warm night in Brooklyn, things kicked off with the England-based Ethyopian trio named after the harp-like instrument played by  bandleader Temesken Zeleke (the trio is rounded out by drummer Grum Begashaw and vocalist Genet Assefa)  playing a selection of uptempo tunes that showcased the band’s talent and also Zeleke’s skills They kept everything very uptempo except for a short period in which the bandleader switched to a more traditional acoustic version of the instrument.

Assefa has great energy and chemistry with the band and audience, dancing and singing the music with great feeling, being the ideal frontwoman for a trio with two musicians who are extremely focused on their instruments.  During the more uptempo moments, she led the crowd to clap and sing along with the chorus even if most couldn’t understand a word.

Though Krar Kollective’s music is deeply rooted into tradition, they clearly have strong pop influences – Tamesken uses a variety of pedals to create a full band effect with an intensely improvisational sound, while Begashaw’s drumming  has a strong, Ringo-like rock vibe.

There was a strong NYPD presence at the show – I spoke to one officer, who told me that they were there following the recent military coup attempt in Turkey  – He said that they didn’t expect any issues, but stated that city officials would rather be safe than sorry. I smiled when he said that, and he thanked me for understanding, considering the anti-cop attitude that has dominated the media in recent times. I shook his hand and went back to hearing the music – there was some great music to be heard.

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Hakim

After a brief intermission, Egypt’s Hakim came on backed by a 12-piece band that included two keyboardists, a  three-piece horn section, several percussionists and electric guitar and bass.

Hakim’s very tight band  kicked things off with a funky instrumental piece that preceded the singer’s entrance.  As he entered to thunderous applause wearing a t-shirt with the inscription “Visit Egypt” , the singer immediately engaged with the crowd, greeting them in Arabic and getting to the hits, which most of his fans sang along to.

I had never heard Hakim on a live setting before, and was impressed with his command of the stage. He seemed to look straight into the eyes of audience members and was friendly with the photographers on the pit, stopping to pose for them as he belted out the music.

The band was well rehearsed, but they allowed various spontaneous moments  – one of the guitarists played an extended solo, and an accordionist had many opportunities to  throw in a few improvised riffs.

 

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Hakin does his thing

I was a little disappointed that Hakim didn’t even bother to greet non-Arabic speaking fans in English, but you could see he was inside his comfort zone, with many of his compatriots waving Egyptian flags as they lost themselves into the music.

He kept the energy level up during the entire set, and mostly stayed away from ballads except for one moment when he went into a more traditional direction with a 7/8 tempo tune. Apart from that it was party time as the singer got almost entire crowd to their feet to dance.

It was a very nice evening  – the energy was great and the music was highly inspiring, and it made for a fantastic musical discovery.

LAMC Shows at Summerstage and Celebrate Brooklyn

by Ernest Barteldes

I wish I had more time to attend everything that goes on at LAMC, but the truth is that this blog has not yet become profitable, and frankly I would rather not deal with some of the editors that have taken over some of the publications I used to write for (and the editors that were there before, they have all moved on to something else – as have I in a way).

So I did submit reviews of shows I attended at the venues above as part of the annual Latin Alternative Music Conference, but I’d like to share some of the more visual moments of those two evenings – stay tuned for actual reviews on All About Jazz soon.

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Hurray for The Riffraff played a very interesting World Music Set

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Hurray for the Riffraff at Celebrate Brooklyn

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More from Hurray to the Riffraff

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At Summerstage, Rodrigo Amarante… uh.. not really rocked anything. Just  navel-gazed for his entire set

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Tried to get what this dude was about, but he avoided anything anybody knew

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I tried to get it but… no

Outdoor Music: What to hear in July

by Ernest Barteldes

 

Last month I wrote about what to hear in June – since I was away in Poland for half of the month and thanks to the weekend glitches of the MTA, I was only able to hear one, which I recently reviewed for All About Jazz (I was going to run it in these pages, but I felt it would reach more readers there – I am not greedy). But now it’s time to look into July.

Please note that I am only writing about the free shows here – there are some interesting benefit concerts this month, but I chose to shine a light on the ones anyone can attend without shelling out.

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King Sunny Ade

I wouldn’t normally bother about shows during the Independence Day Weekend – everyone’s going to be somewhere else (myself included), but I do have some great recommendations for the next couple of weeks. But please note that the Nigerian legend King Sunny Ade will be at Summerstage on July 3 o what is his first North American tour since 2009  – so in case you will not be sunning yourself, don’t miss that show.

On  Thursday, July 7th,  a performance not to be missed is an evening of Indian-inspired music that begins with DJ Rekha (one of the leading Bangra MCs out there), and two of my personal favorite musicians: Karsh Kale, one of the most inventive songwriters I have ever heard.

About a decade ago, he joined forces with sitarist Anoushka Shankar (the daughter of Ravi Shankar and half sister of Norah Jones) for one of Breathing Under Water, one of the most brilliant World Music albums released in the 21st Century.  Closing the evening is the Sunny Jain-led Red Baraat, dubbed “one of the best party band around.”

I am sure to be there, even if I have an early start on Friday.

The second weekend in  July marks the highly anticipated (as far as I am concerned)  Latin Alternative Music Conference, an event that brings together media, musicians and labels for a smorgasbord of showcases, concerts and industry-related panel discussions – the most interesting for the general public being the free concerts they sponsor both at Summerstage and Celebrate Brooklyn.

On July 8, Rodrigo Amarante,  the co-founder of Brazilian rock band Los Hermanos and Orquestra Imperial (a samba supergroup that also features Moreno Veloso), takes the stage at Rumsey Playfield to showcase music from his debut solo album “Cavalo” (Horse). The evening also features Mexico’s Leon Carregui, one of this year’s breakthrough Latin artists. The next day, head over to Brooklyn to hear local Latin artists Buscabulla and Hurray for the Riff Raff and of course the headlining artist – Mexico’s Carla Morrison.

There aren’t many living jazz singers who I would say are among the greatest in history, but Diane Reeves (Queensbridge Park, July 27)  is surely among them.  Sex and The City fans will remember her belting out “Is That All There Is” on the season 5 finale, but I have paid attention to her for quite a while. She is incredibly versatile and tackles various genres without losing her signature style.  Opening for her is DJ Greg Caz, arguably the the most musically open-minded DJ in New York City – he not only loves music but has a deep knowledge of it that baffles me at times.

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Gregory Porter

Closing my recommendations for July is Gregory Porter (Celebrate Brooklyn, July 28) – his deep baritone and has you at hello, as I discovered when I first heard about him via the Starbucks app (gone are the days that they gave out music, thanks to their current partnership with Spotify). I heard him last year at Summerstage and was fascinated at his command of the stage and his captivating personality, and am eager to hear his music again in a live format.