Live Review: Laura Cheadle at Piano’s, April 15, 2017

 

Laura Cheadle

Piano’s NYC

New York City

April 15, 2017

article and photos by Ernest Barteldeslaura1

Laura Cheadle traveled light on her recent appearance at Piano’s in New York’s Lower East Side – instead of her full Family Band she was backed solely by her own acoustic guitar, her father James Cheadle on keyboards and a drummer (Cheadle, Sr.  did the basslines on the left-hand side of his instrument), mostly showcasing material from her download-only EP “Chill,” out that day.

She opened the set with an uptempo take on Stevie Wonder’s  “I Was Made To Love Her,” a soul ballad whose lyrics speak of finally finding love and being unapologetic about it. She followed that with “Reverberate,” another tune from “Chill” that has a funky feel.  Cheadle and her father have great chemistry together, and that is evident as her body language affects how he plays – stops are clearly unrehearsed, but since they know each other so well musically it is just seamless.

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The audience received the new material well, but things really caught fire when she did a medley of some choice covers including  a low-tempo take on B.B. King’s “The Thrill is Gone” (in which she took over the drums), James Brown’s “I Feel Good,” Aretha Franklin’s “Chain of Fools” and two Stevie Wonder tunes, “Superstition” and “Higher Ground,” the latter of which really showcased her vocal range. During the medley, she left the stage and danced around fans (she even surprised me by coming to my side while I was busy with my notes).

The show ended in a high note – everyone seemed to be having a good time – unfortunately there wasn’t a second set (Piano’s has one set by each listed artist) so we didn’t have a chance for a some more of Cheadle’s music.

Concert Review: Laura Cheadle Band at Pianos

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Laura Cheadle Family Band

Pianos

Saturday, March 5th

New York, NY

 

Backed by James “Papa” Cheadle on keyboards, a Tina Young on drums and her own electric guitar, South Jersey-born Laura Cheadle took to the stage of New York’s Pianos opening with B.B. King’s 1980 hit “The Thrill Is Gone,” played in a faster groove than the original recording, showcasing her vocal range and rhythm guitar. Given the intimate setting, she ventured into the audience, encouraging everyone to dance along with her. She followed that with a very personal take on The Beatles’ “Come Together”, taking it into a more bluesy direction, contrasting with Lennon’s more psychedelic feel. Her mother was present at the gig, so she dedicated an inspired rendition of Stevie Wonder’s “Love The Little Things About You” to her.

She then featured a few originals including a funk-laden tune about the end of a love affair, and also debuted a new tune called “Blues Hangs Out,” which got great applause from the audience, and then did a nice cover of James Brown’s “I Feel Good,” sticking close to the original. This was the first time I had heard Cheadle do so many covers in a single set. She also included a take on the classic soul tune “Train, Train,” a song that she said her parents – who recently celebrated their anniversary – danced to early in their relationship.

The stripped-down format (no lead guitar or extra keyboards, usually handled by her two brothers) specially showcased “Papa” Cheadle’s talents. He not only handles the keyboards, but also adds the bass textures to the music. He is an incredibly talented artist, but I do think that he would sound even better if Laura Cheadle added a bass player to her ensemble. Quite a few years ago she did have a bassist, but apparently things didn’t work out, and since Mr. Cheadle does handle the low frequencies on his keys (as The Doors did) I guess they probably decided that it was best to keep things that way.

Laura Cheadle is a highly gifted singer and songwriter with fantastic rapport with the audience. She is one of the few artists I have seen who integrates her family into the entire picture, acknowledging not only her father and musical director but all of those who have helped make who she has become.

Concert Review: Mehmet Polat Trio at Drom

Mehmet Polat Trio

Drom

January 19th 2016

New York, NY

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By Ernest Barteldes

 

On the closing concert of their tour in support of Next Spring (Homerecords.be, 2015), the Mehmet Polat Trio (Polat: oud; Sinan Arat: ney; Bao Sissoko : kora) took to the stage of New York City’s Drom for a selection of original songs.  Polat briefly introduced the trio telling the audience what the music was about and immediately set out into their set, opening with a mellow-sounding number based around a simple chord sequence, with all the members freely improvising around the melody.

Without interruption, they went right into the second number, a syncopated tune mostly based around Sissoko’s instrument. The trio kept at this pace, going from seamlessly from song to song without pausing – the end of each tune prompted the next, but the differences were quite noticeable as the rhythm and melodic groove constantly changed.

The chemistry that Polat, Arat and Sissoko have is very evident – just a glance at each other is enough to communicate where the music might be going, and during improvised moments they just find themselves in great synchronicity, finishing off a solo where one of them left off. During a short break between songs, Polat talked about their instruments’ origins and their sonic particularities, and then went on to play two final tunes, beginning with a composition by Sissoko that had a strong West African feel with some traditional Turkish tones in between. The groove seemed to go around a single chord with lots of improvised moments. They closed the set with a tune that was based around the kora and that picked up speed every few bars, which kept audience members wondering when it was actually going to end – a simple melody that stayed in my head for at least a few hours.

The Mehmet Polat Trio rarely performs stateside, but they should be returning in the summer – it would be great to hear them again, since we don’t have many opportunities to hear a group to dares to take traditional music to the next level – one that so greatly integrates two cultures in such an amazing manner.

An Afternoon at the 11th Edition of The Polish Film Festival

11th Polish Film Festival

Anthology Archives

May 2, 2015

By Ernest Barteldes

I am an occasional fan of Polish movies, and have been way before I even met Renata (most assume my interest is because of our relationship, but the fact is that I had been exposed to the music and cinema of Poland years before I met her), but for some reason I had never attended any of the 10 previous editions of the NY Polish Film Festival – something I remedied this year.

When I heard about the event , I invited a number of friends to go, but few responded. I looked up the schedule and found one by Jerzy Stuhr, a director whose career I have erratically followed  since I saw his Love Stories (Historie miłosne, 1997), a clever film that he wrote, directed and starred in, playing four different characters who are given a life choice – and the consequences that come with those decisions.

I went alone on Saturday afternoon (Renata had another commitment at that time) to catch Stuhr’s latest film, “Citizen”(Obywatel), a satire about a man who grew up within the confines of the Polish communist government and then has a hard time adapting to the new reality, losing break after break until one unexpected turn comes around.

We see the story mostly through flashbacks – Sturh’s character has a debilitating accident early in the film and then we see his life all the way from his days as a young man (played by his son, Maciej) all the way to present time – and his current predicament.

I feel that Stuhr has a very similar style to that of Woody Allen – he takes current events in his country and builds highly personal stories. For instance, Sex Mission borrowed from Allen’s “The Sleeper” and then expands to something way deeper.

After a brief break that included Zwiec beer and some snacks, Renata and our friend David joined me for the next film, “Gods,” a story based on the true story of Zbigniew Religa (Tomasz Kot) the doctor who performed the first successful heart transplant in Poland.

The story follows Zeliga’s battle not only with authorities but also the frame of mind of the time – that the heart might be somehow a sentient organ, and that a transplant would at least be likened to stealing someone’s soul.

“Gods” was superbly acted and made, reflecting with accuracy the time but also the politics behind medical advancement in Poland during communism. No wonder the film was awarded Best Film at the end of the festival. In addition, Kot was deservedly  awarded best actor for his amazing performance.