SummerStage in Central Park: Chicano Batman & Los Pericos at LAMC

by Ernest Barteldes

Chicano Batman + Los Pericos

LAMC at Summerstage in Central Park

July 15, 2017

 

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Chicano Batman

Los Angeles-based Chicano Batman came on stage with their Psychedelic-inspired sound, complete with Mellotron-based tunes and a look more suited to Ed Sullivan circa 1968 then Central Park in 2017, but I guess that is the message they want to convey. Though mostly a quartet, they were often enhanced by a pair of backing vocalists – one whom took over the keyboards when lead singer Eduardo Arenas either stepped away from the mic to sing lead or played guitar.

I half expected this edition of the LAMC to be a bit political given the current divisions in the United States, but was surprised that no one spoke of walls or anything related to the current president in this country: it was all about the music and little else. The band instead took the opportunity to showcase as many of their influences as possible, including a Cumbia-inflected tune and a ranchera in which the bassist took over the guitar while Arenas took over the bass guitar.

Chicano Batman has great chemistry together, but it seems they are not yet ready to play large stages like Rumsey Playfield.  There is no doubt about their talent – their instrumental moments were quite great – but they seemed a bit overwhelmed about being before a numerous audience like the ones often seen there – I guess we are looking at diamonds in the rough, and would be happy to learn they’ve evolved in coming years.

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Los Pericos

After a short break, Argentina’s Los Pericos brought a mix of funk and reggae with a Latin take – I felt they were very influenced by Brazil’s Paralamas do Sucesso – that got the audience moving from the moment they played their first chord.  They had great energy and effectively communicated with the crowd by calling on the different nationalities represented there.

Los Pericos has been around for three decades, and their set reflected that experience: the music went from disco-inflected moments to salsa and various other rhythms while never losing touch with their original influences. Since there were many in the audience who had probably never heard of them, the band jam-packed their set with their best material so people could know what they were about.  A handful of their tunes were in English – with lyrics that either talked about heartbreak or romantic defiance – but most were in their native Spanish.

It was a wonderful afternoon – I just wish the weather on Friday had been a bit better so I could have caught the showcase at Celebrate Brooklyn the previous night – it would have made for a much better musical experience.

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Concert Review: Tito Nieves at East River Park

Tito Nieves at East River Park

Tito Nieves at East River Park

By Ernest Barteldes

Tito Nieves

Summerstage at East River Park Amphitheatre

August 4, 2015

New York, NY

Playing before a filled to capacity East River Park Amphitheater,  salsa legend Tito Nieves took to the stage backed by a 10-piece band and kicked the set with a high energy number that had those standing next to the stage pairing up to dance. He paused briefly to thank the audience for being there and saying he was happy to be ‘back home’ to the Lower East Side.  He then followed with the English-language “I’ll Always Love You” (not to be confused with the Dolly Parton hit of the same name).  He also coached the audience to scream at the top of their lungs (“for New York”) during an up-tempo number that celebrated being part of this city’s community.

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Nieves then stepped back to the backing microphones as he brought his three backing vocalists to the spotlight as each sang lead in one number – something you don’t usually see with major stars. One of the tunes name-called several Latin American countries and got a screaming ovation when Puerto Rico was mentioned. When Nieves returned to the lead microphone, he briefly spoke of the various Latin clubs he performed in New York, and tricked the audience when he mentioned a place that was not a club but a popular hotel.

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Nieves is regarded as “The Pavarotti of salsa”, and deservedly gets that nickname.  He has great energy and a potent voice – he has great communication with his fans, and sings each number with great feeling. That is especially true with tunes that have something deeper to say – an example of this is “Fabricando Fantasias,” a mid-tempo ballad about a bitter breakup and a man’s refusal to accept the end of a love affair.

Towards the end of the set, the pace picked up and became almost relentless – Nieves had a burst of energy at this point – songs just came one after the other with no pause.  At the encore he did a very up-tempo song in which he jumped and stopped the band for several fake endings that made the audience scream.

I was half hoping that Nieves would include a couple of songs from Unity (Universal Music), the Michael Jackson salsa tribute album he participated in earlier this year. That didn’t happen, but the choices were clearly crowd-pleasers for his core fans.  It was a lovely evening of Latin Music in just the right atmosphere.