What to Hear in August: BRIC Celebrate Brooklyn, Bryant Park, Brasil Summerfest, SummerStage and Charlie Parker Jazz Festival

By Ernest Barteldes

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I kind of hate the month of August, because that is when most of the outdoor events begin winding down – Celebrate Brooklyn wraps halfway through the month, while SummerStage continues hosting free shows until pretty much the end of the month, capping the program with the Charlie Parker Jazz Festival in Harlem and the East Village, the locales of reference for the annual event in honor of one of the heroes of the bebop era.

For those who missed it in theaters (and still haven’t watched it at home), Creed tells the story of Donnie Johnson – the illegitimate son of Apollo Creed – who goes after his own dream of becoming a champion boxer. To help him on his quest, he seeks the help of an aging Rocky Balboa to become his coach –  possibly closing the Rocky saga. The movie will be screened with a live score performed by The Wordless Music Orchestra conducted by its composer Ludwig Gorannson. Opening the evening is a selection of Gospel music by Frank Haye & The Interdenominational Choir – should be a good one and I will certainly be in attendance (Celebrate Brooklyn, Aug. 4)

Things take a Brazilian flavor at Summerstage with the kickoff of Brazil Summerfest, a weeklong event that showcases various  talents from my other country: legendary singer Elza Soares – still unstoppable at 80 – headlines an afternoon at Central Park that also features Youtube-discovered Linkner e os Caramelows and a DJ set by Teleseen. During the following week there will be concerts in various venues featuring Forro in the Dark (Brooklyn Public Library, August 9).  Aline Muniz (Joe’s Pub, August 10), Zabele ( The Django, August 13) and many others, ending with a massive Brazilian-inspired street fair  (Hester Street Fair, August 14) .

Bryant Park continues its summer program with a concert by the Asian Cultural Symphony to the US – an ensemble of more than 60 musicians, followed by Shoko Nagal’s TOKALA, which explores sonic influences from classic and contemporary Asian sounds (August 11, Bryant Park)

Most people know about Senegalese singer-songwriter Youssou N’ Dour from his iconic tune “7 Seconds,” but  he is beloved among World Music lovers – he has a long career that includes many records and countless collaborations with artists from across the globe – a fitting closing to what has been a stellar run at Celebrate Brooklyn (August 12, Celebrate Brooklyn)

Taj Mahal and Keb’ Mo’ are blues legends in their own right, and I cannot wait to hear how they sound as they join forces – it is sure going to be a meeting of generations and it is a show I am sure not to miss under any circumstance – just imagine how much great music will come from those two together on stage. (Central Park, August 13)

I have heard Anat Cohen in various formats both as a side player with Duduka Da Fonseca with her two brothers in their Three Cohens ensemble  and also leading her own chorinho-inspired group. She is a phenomenal clarinetist and at The Charlie Parker Jazz Festival she will be leading her Tenet in a program that will include her many influences, going from Brazilian to Middle Eastern and some New Orleans material in between (Marcus Garvey Park, August 25)

We wrap up the list with quite a stellar line-up of saxophonists: Joshua Redman, Lou Donaldson and Tia Fuller will close the Charlie Parker Jazz Festival – one can’t help but wonder if they will get together at the end of the day for an improvisational threesome. It might be unlikely, but one can only hope — and then we go over to Labor Day with a nice taste of great music (August 27, Tompkins Square Park)

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Concert Review: Trio da Paz Featuring Joyce Moreno and Dori Caymmi at Birdland

 

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By Ernest Barteldes

Trio da Paz

Featuring Joyce Moreno and Dory Caymmi

Birdland

February 25, 2016

New York, NY

 

 

Trio da Paz – the legendary Brazilian jazz trio formed by Duduka Da Fonseca, Nilson Matta and Romero Lubambo – celebrated the release of their 30th Anniversary CD with a residence at New York’s Birdland Jazz Club with special guests Joyce Moreno and Dory Caymmi – the first time all five artists collaborated on a live setting.

The trio started out with “Saudade da Bahia,” a tune by the late Dorival Caymmi with an arrangement built around Lubambo’s lead guitar and improvisations. It was a clear demonstration of their great chemistry, as they responded to the guitarist’s accents with barely a look at each other.  Moreno joined them and paid homage to what she called “their predecessors” with a very personal rendition of “Chega de Saudade”, beginning accompanied by her own guitar and joined by the band after a few measures. She included a few snippets of “Aquarela do Brasil” to the tune as Lubambo riffed around the melody.  She followed by her own “Essa Mulher,” a tune Lubambo mentioned he’d personally selected for the set, including an accomplished bass solo by Matta.   Dori Caymmi joined the group and sang his “Joazinho Boa Pinta” a humorous tune about a good-looking rascal of sorts. The trio left the stage as Caymmi and Moreno played a beautiful duet on Jobim’s “Dindi” with Caymmi on guitar. They followed that with Caetano Veloso’s “Sampa,” a song written as a tribute of Brazil’s largest city.

I like to say that Trio da Paz are “the Rolling Stones” of Brazilian jazz because they have great individual moments as bandleaders in their own right, but there is clearly some magic when they perform and record together.  This perception is renewed every time I hear them live – in spite of all these years, they are symbiotic and work together in a manner  rarely seen with ensembles where the focus is on individuality. This was clear at Birdland, when they took on originals tunes and classics like “Voce Foe a Bahia,” a playful melody on the uniqueness of Caymmi’s native state.

It was a great experience to hear Trio da Paz with their guests – I just wish the set I heard had included Da Fonseca’s “Flying Over Rio” – but I am sure there will be other chances for that soon enough.

 

 

 

Disc review: Trio da Paz “30”

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By Ernest Barteldes

 

Guitarist Romero Lubambo, drummer Duduka Da Fonseca and bassist Nilson Matta are all accomplished bandleaders in their own right, but when they get together as Trio da Paz there is clearly some extra musical magic going on.  The three musicians have fantastic chemistry together, and that can be heard not only on a live format but also in the studio.

The group began via informal rehearsals the three musicians did together before officially creating Trio da Paz, which now celebrates its 30th anniversary with 30 (Zoho), a record containing mostly original material written individually by Lubambo, Da Fonseca and Matta. The album kicks off with “Sampa 67,” a Matta composition that honors the city of the bassist’s birth (not to be confused by the similarly titled Caetano Veloso tune).  The track is centered on the bass and drums with guitar riffs.  They revisit Lubambo’s “For Donato,” a tune played around a bassline that is reminiscent of Dorival Caymmi’s “Samba da Minha Terra” but then goes into a completely different direction.

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The song was previously recorded by its composer on 2002’s Rio de Janeiro Underground, but here the arrangement is markedly faster than the original recording, focusing on all three band members.  Also revisited is Da Fonseca’s “Flying Over Rio,” a song previously featured on the drummer’s quintet album “Samba Jazz (Anzic, 2013). The Trio da Paz version is more stripped down, focusing on Lubambo’s nuanced guitar playing.

 

The trio also pays tribute to the late master guitarist Baden Powell with a cover of his “Samba Triste,” here played as an antithesis of its title – instead of being a “sad samba,” it appears as an up-tempo melody that showcases the band members’ individual chops.  It is notable that Lubambo recorded a handful of tracks using electric guitar (something I have never heard him doing with Trio da Paz) – “Outono, “a slow bossa that features a melodious solo from Matta, and also the aforementioned “Flying Over Rio.”

As someone who has seen this trio perform live many times in the past decade, I cannot wait to hear how they will treat these tunes on stage. I have been in awe of their music ever since I heard them for the first time at the Jazz Standard in 2005, and I hope they stick around for a very long time.