LAMC At Summerstage: Nathy Peluso and Ile

By Ernest Barteldes

Latin Alternative Music Conference

At Summerstage in Central Park

Nathy Peluso and Ile

New York, NY

July 10th, 2019

 

The heat and intense humidity in the air did not stop fans from flocking to Central Park for the first round of free shows scheduled at part of the 20th Anniversary of the Latin Alternative Music Conference in New York City, which featured Argentinean singer/rapper Nathy Peluso, Puerto Rican singer-songwriter Ile and Mexican pop singer-songwriter Ximena Sariñana.

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Nathy Peluso/Karlo X. Ramos

Peluso came on stage with a small backing band featuring a mix of soul, rock and hip-hop – featuring the latter during most of the set. She had great energy on stage, dancing along with the instrumental sections of every tune. One of the highlights came with a rap based on the chorus of the Cher hit “Bang (My Baby Shot Me Down),” whose English verses she sang herself.

The set also featured an instrumental mambo which she described as “the wonderful sound” showcasing her backup band, to whom she gyrated throughout, finally confessing that she is “a mambo killer” as a (probable) excuse for not singing it.

After a brief break, Puerto Rican singer (and former Calle 13 member) Ile took to the stage backed by a large band featuring trombones, percussion, bass, electric and acoustic guitars and drums featuring songs with strong Afro-Caribbean influence quite distant from what she did with her previous group. Her opening song had a strong political message, pointing fingers at those who oppress and try to silence the voice of her native land. She followed that with “Invenclble,” a tune with a pop-meets-Latin beat that she described as something she wrote to embrace her hormones and the realities of being a woman.

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Ile/Ernest Barteldes

She followed that with “Temes,” a bolero “against that patriarchy with the clear intention of destroying it,” with lyrics that repeatedly asked “why do you fear me?” in Spanish. Next came “Côncavo,” a bolero which descriptive lyrics that would probably be labeled “explicit” if it had been recorded in English, with subtle references to specific body parts and passions involving them.

Among the highlights was a tune that featured nothing but drums played by the entire group that highlighted the problems faced by Puerto Rico – she mentioned the recent arrests of top Puerto Rico officials over corruption charges, and ended the tune urging the audience to “stop voting for stupid people” without naming anyone in particular.

She closed the set with “Dejame Decirte,” a straight salsa written in collaboration with Eddie Palmeri – it was a great closing that highlighted Ile’s range, which goes from more folk-driven music to pop and pretty much every other Latin influence.

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Ile/Ernest Barteldes