Music Preview: Bibi Ferreira at Symphony Space, New York City

9ce4c341-2fa8-43d2-b9db-2dd335cf0c15

By Ernest Barteldes

Bibi Ferreira

Tuesday, Sept. 20 & 23

Symphony Space

8 PM

I have known about the legendary Brazilian diva Bibi Ferreira for a very long time – she has a long history as a singer, producer, actress and director going from the 1940s to present. She is still active in spite of being 94 years young – and gives no signs of slowing down anytime soon.

I did two interviews with her for The Brasilians over the past few years and was surprised not only by how articulate she was on the phone and also by her fantastic memory – she can remember details of shows she did generations ago as if she had walked out of stage five minutes ago. I was even more amazed to hear her live at Alice Tully Hall – hard to believe is was her New York debut – and heard her sing an array of hard tunes ranging from Verdi to Chico Buarque and Piaf – as if they were nothing.

And then there was Liza Minelli’s hilarious surprise appearance, when they shared the mike for a snippet of “Theme from New York, New York” – a tune made famous by Frank Sinatra but actually introduced by Minelli (go ahead, Google it) in 1972.

On her current show Four Times Bibi, she pays tribute to fado queen Amalia Rodrigues, Piaf, tango legend Carlos Gardel and none other than our own Frank Sinatra – an evening that will bring together various genres together in what promises to be nothing short of amazing – a show that is not to be missed.

Advertisements

Concert Review: Brasil Guitar Duo at Americas Society

 

 

 

guitarduo

By Ernest Barteldes

 

Brasil Guitar Duo

Americas  Society

February 19, 2016

New York, NY

 

 

Playing before a filed room in New York’s  Americas Society, The Brasil Guitar Duo formed by João Luiz and Douglas Lora kicked off their CD release event with Astor Piazzola’s “Zita,” a complex tango that the duo arranged for two guitars and set the tone for the rest of the evening. The duo played with zero amplification (there were two overhead microphones, but I believe those were for recording the set), but the acoustics of the room made it possible for them to be heard no matter where you were seated. They continued with Jean-Phillipe Rameau’s “Les Cyclops,” a tune that showcased their soloing and chord techniques.

They followed with Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco’s “Prelude and The Fugue no. 7,” a very interesting Bach-inspired composition filled with 1/16 notes and changing tempos. They followed that with a selection of tunes by Brazilian composer Egberto Gismonti, beginning with “A Fala da Paixão,” a mellow ballad in which Luiz played solos filled with octaves, and followed with “Sete Anéis,” a tune with a strong rural Brazilian feel and a quirky middle section with harmonics and extraneous sounds.

After a brief intermission, they played Leo Brouwer’s “Sonata de Los Viajeros,” a track from their CD dedicated to the works of the Cuban composer, which was released that evening. The composition is divided into four distinctive movements, beginning with “Primer Viaje a Tierras Heladas,” which started with a tranquil mood and then became agitated, as to represent the travelers’ journey from the Caribbean Sea to the North Atlantic. “La Venus de Praxiteles” had more of a contemplative feel, while “Visita a Bach en Leipzig” had more of a classical feel. The piece ended with “Por El Mar de Las Antillas,” which had a traditional Cuban feel.

The concert ended with Marco Pereira’s “Bate-Coxa,” an up-tempo “Coco,” a popular northeastern Brazilian beat. It was a nice closing to the concert, since it got out of the seriousness of Brouwer’s composition, taking the music to a more playful feel.

The concert was hosted by WQXR’s Terrance McKnight, who talked with the musicians between songs, tracing their musical influences and their beginnings and also their working relationship and their musical choices. They also talked about their beginnings in Brazil and the guitar teacher who first had them play together when they were younger.